Leading with Tact

One of the biggest things that leaders in the organization must keep in mind is tact.  Tact is defined as “a keen sense of what to say or do to avoid giving offense; skill in dealing with difficult or delicate situations.”  So what exactly does it mean for leaders to lead with tact?  I believe that in order to lead with tact, it is important to keep the following three elements in mind:

tact

Avoid playing favorites.

As a leader, it’s our jobs to be fair to our personnel.  While there may be people we like more than others, it’s something that not only needs to be kept to ourselves, but cannot affect our decision-making.  In order to avoid playing favorites, it’s important that we are cognizant of our own biases toward certain individuals.  A leader’s job is to bring out the best in everyone, which we can’t do if people are seeing bias in how we treat others.

 

Avoid putting down others.

While there may be people in the organization we don’t necessarily get along with, it’s important that we keep it to ourselves and avoid letting our personal opinions influence ours and others’ decisions.  While it’s okay to give constructive criticism, it’s not acceptable for leaders to put down others solely because they don’t like the person.  When we publically put down other people, it not only affects our credibility as leaders, it also potentially burns bridges between us and the person we discredited.

 

Know what to say and when to say it.

Leaders in the organization are responsible for making important decisions that may affect many people.  While leaders should effectively communicate information to others in the organization, it’s important to keep in mind the appropriate context for presenting the information and the appropriate audience to present the information to.  Leaders are constantly exposed to sensitive information, and it’s important to keep the timing, audience, and context in mind when presenting it to others.

 

Please feel free to share your thoughts by commenting below.

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